Procedures

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Blepharoplasty

Blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery) is a plastic surgery procedure for correcting sagging or drooping eyelids. The eyelid, because its skin is much thinner than that in other parts of the face, is often one of the first facial areas to exhibit signs of aging. Eyelids that sag or droop can affect peripheral vision, making daily activities such as driving more difficult. Blepharoplasty may become necessary when various factors, which include aging, sun damage, smoking and obesity, cause the muscles and tissue that support the eyelids to weaken.

Canaloplasty

Canaloplasty is an advanced surgical procedure used for patients with open-angle glaucoma, the most common type of glaucoma. It causes the fluid in the eye to drain too slowly through the eye's network of tiny drainage channels, resulting in an increased pressure within the eye. Canaloplasty is a minimally invasive treatment that can substantially reduce eye pressure.

Cataract Surgery

A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye; cataract surgery is performed to improve vision by replacing the clouded lens with an artificial one. Cataracts affect millions of people in the United States each year. Most cataracts are the result of aging, though some form as a result of genetic factors, disease or injury. Cataract surgery is common, and considered safe and effective.

LASIK

LASIK, an acronym for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis, is a refractive procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. It is the most common type of refractive surgery. Using targeted laser beam energy, the LASIK procedure reshapes the cornea so that light rays are focused more precisely on the retina, producing clear, sharp vision.

Monovision LASIK

Monovision LASIK surgery corrects one eye for distance and the other eye for near vision, eliminating or reducing the need for patients with presbyopia to rely on glasses or contacts. Patients retain both near and distance vision after LASIK surgery. For those patients, age 40 and older, who wear bifocals or reading glasses, monovision LASIK may be an option.

Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK)

Photorefractive keratectomy, or PRK, is a laser vision correction procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct mild to moderate conditions of myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism. It is the second most common type of laser eye surgery after LASIK. While during LASIK a flap is created to access the cornea, during PRK the entire epithelial layer of the cornea is removed and later allowed to grow back. During both processes, the cornea is reshaped to provide vision correction.

Types of IOLs

A wide range of replacement lenses are available to cataract patients, each offering different advantages for post-surgery vision. The most effective lens to use depends on the patient's individual preferences and goals for their vision. The lenses eliminate the need for glasses or contacts after cataract surgery, providing most patients with convenient, effective results for their specific vision conditions.
American Academy of Ophthalmology American Board of Ophthalmology (ABOP) California Academy of Eye Physician and Surgeons